What is braille?

A Question A Day
Publié le 20/11/18Modifié le 20/03/19

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You’ve got good eyesight so it’s easy to read. You just open a magazine and read the print.

But how could blind or partially sighted people manage?

They read braille. This writing was invented by a Frenchman, Louis Braille, in 1825, who became blind following a childhood accident. Braille is a system of writing with raised dots. People read with their fingers. Each braille cell consists of six raised dots which can be combined in 63 different ways to write anything. This alphabet has been adapted to many languages and there is a World Braille Council. 

To learn to read in school, blind or partially sighted children learn to develop their sense of touch. Little by little they used both hands and ten fingers to read quickly. When computers came along, software was created to help the partially sighted and blind. Software can translate words spoken into a microphone directly into braille. Then you just have to print out the text to read it with your fingers. There are books in braille on many subjects: maths, literature, cooking, poetry, music and even childrens’ books.

It’s only natural, there are 45 million blind people in the world who in spite of their handicap live like us all.

Nom de l'auteur : Jacques Azam

Producteur : Milan Presse, France Télévisions

Année de copyright : 2018

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